Maxim Massenkoff

PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley


Bio

Contact

Working Papers

Work in Progress

Publications

Teaching

Data

Google Scholar

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Bio

I am a PhD candidate at the Department of Economics at UC Berkeley. My interests are Behavioral Economics, Labor Economics, and Public Economics. Before coming to Berkeley I worked at the Federal Reserve Board and Harvard Psychology Department.

I am on the Economics job market this year and will be available for interviews at the 2020 ASSA Meetings in San Diego.

Curriculum Vitae


Contact

Email: massenkoff@berkeley.edu


Working Papers

Family formation and crime (Job market paper)

(with Evan Rose)

Abstract (click to expand)

Coverage: Marginal Revolution, Mother Jones

Job search and unemployment insurance: New evidence from one million audits

Abstract (click to expand)


Work in Progress

The effects of strikes on firms and workers

(with Nathan Wilmers )

Abstract (click to expand)

Nudges to promote truthful earnings reporting

(with Andrew Johnston)


Publications (pre-PhD)

Kill or die: Moral judgment alters linguistic coding of causality

(with Julian De Freitas, Peter DeScioli, Jason Nemirow, and Steven Pinker)

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 2017

Abstract (click to expand)

Equity or equality? Moral judgments follow the money

(with Peter DeScioli, Alex Shaw, Michael Bang Petersen, and Robert Kurzban)

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 2014

Abstract (click to expand)

How universal is the Big Five? Testing the five-factor model of personality variation among forager–farmers in the Bolivian Amazon

(with Michael Gurven, Christopher von Rueden, Hillard Kaplan, and Marino Lero Vie)

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013

Abstract (click to expand)


Teaching

Mistakey paper

Avi Feller and I wrote a problematic evaluation for his Program Evaluation course at the Goldman School. There are ten deliberate conceptual mistakes. (solutions)

Button

Liz Fosslien and I made a confusion button, which allows students to anonymously signal when they're confused in lecture. The lecturer page shows how many people press the button every 30 seconds. If you're curious to try this out in your class, email me and I'll be happy to set it up for you.

Website: Design by Xinyue Lin via Gautam Rao.